1867

1867

Nathan Solomon Joseph, one of the most famous synagogue architects of the time remodelled the chapel. He was architect-surveyor of the United Synagogue, was Chairman of the Russo-Sanitary Committee, the Board of Guardians, the Sanitary Committee and brother-in-law to the Chief Rabbi. The character of the chapel building was sympathetic to a synagogue in lay out being neutral in plan. Joseph kept many original features of the Georgian interior, including the roof and the balcony, which was perfect for the women’s section of the synagogue. The original entrance to the chapel had been in a tiny alley called Parliament Court, which runs along the back of the synagogue building today.¬†Because Jews pray in the direction of Jerusalem, which in London, is towards the southeast, the original entrance was bricked up, the Ark was placed on the southeast wall and a new front door was created on the northwest of the building, opening onto Sandys Row. The design of the interior of Sandys Row was based on The Great Synagogue in Dukes Place (since demolished) with a coved ceiling, cornice with a Neo-classical mahogany Torah Ark set into an apse. Much of the interior is unaltered since its construction in the nineteenth century apart from the pine pews and the wood pine panelling, which covers most of the interior walls. These features were added in the 1950s.